• Shortcuts by landlords and tenants exercising rights lead to a crisis within the industry

  • Well being and safety are major concerns as demands increase

“It’s getting ridiculous!” these are the comments I hear from an experienced Property Manager as I walk into the office of a company in Wellington. “I’ve had enough!” The business owner looks at me and asks ‘Is it just us going through this?” 

I answer her, “No, it’s happening everywhere”.

A few hours earlier, I received a message from a client in the South Island. They were losing their best Property Manager. She has simply had enough. She was sick of dealing with landlords complaining about all the work that they are being forced to undertake and also dealing with tenants, many of which now had a sense of entitlement. ‘I’ve spoken to Tenancy Services and know my rights!” She wasn’t leaving for another job, she had simply had enough and the straw that broke the camel’s back was a call from an abusive landlord. These are not isolated cases.

It is happening every day and our industry is staring down the barrel of a crisis. A crisis created by too much change happening too quickly leading to an increasing shortage of rental properties, with many small Mum and Dad investors leaving the market leading to an over-inflated increase in rents. A crisis self-created by the Property Management industry, as a deregulated industry, consumed by an oversupply of Property Management companies, undercut each other in an attempt to secure business. This has led to a drop in fees meaning that the Property Manager has to manage too many properties to make the business worthwhile, which in turn leads to staff feeling underpaid and overwhelmed with high staff turnover.

Do not get me wrong, tenants should stand up for their rights if they feel that they have been exploited. However, there are more and more cases of people exploiting the system. The abuse that comes with this has intensified and conditions for property managers have probably never been tougher. 

Many people are now leaving the industry and new people who enter the industry struggle to cope – shocked by the intensity of their role, they often leave after six months.

Greater demands on landlords following through to Property Managers

As rents have increased disproportionately due to demands placed on landlords by the Government, the demands of tenants have increased as well. This has played into the media’s hands. Many tenants have highlighted their plight in the media, creating a victim mentality amongst many. Tenants have a far better understanding of their rights and are not afraid to exercise them. We have absolutely no issue with tenants justifiably standing for their rights and in many cases, we implore tenants to do so. However, we now have a situation where many tenants are exploiting the system, trying to secure a windfall $4,000.

In my time working within the Property Management industry, I cannot recall a time when conditions have been so bad for Property Managers working up and down the country. Many of them give their all, working in what can at times feel like a thankless industry. The demands of the job have increased dramatically over the last two years. This has largely been created by increased legislation and changes in the political landscape. However, there are other demands as well. 

As the rental crisis increases, our industry has come under intense scrutiny from the media as they lap up stories from Tenant Advocate groups and individuals trying to make a name for themselves. Journalists constantly seek news stories and troll Tenancy Tribunal orders, looking for shock stories which lead to more and more tenants looking to exploit the system.

Evidence of this is the tenant who recently won a Tribunal case due to the Property Manager insisting that the carpets of her rental needed to be cleaned. Is a case that is worth $90 in carpet cleaning really worthy of making national news?

Then we get a further crass piece of journalism from the Property Management industry’s greatest fan, Rebecca Stevenson. Yes, we all remember Rebecca, with her Spinoff article Why property managers are terrible – for everyone. This time, she makes the accusation that the only reason carpets are cleaned by Property Managers is so we can take our cut.

The sad case is, although there are always things that we can improve on, the Property Manager was doing what she believed was the right thing to do.

Then there is the abuse and sometimes, threats of violence.

The case in question led to abusive comments on social media and a very good Property Manager left feeling distraught. Yes, mistakes were made and it could have been handled differently, however, she was only trying to do the right thing by her owner. Making money was the last thing on her mind. Doing the right thing for the landlord and trying to protect the asset was all she was trying to achieve.

What wasn’t reported in the media was the sterling work this company does for their local community and the money it raises for charities such as Daffodil Day and Breast Cancer Awareness. But that isn’t newsworthy.

Threats of violence and abuse in our industry are getting worse.

Only a fortnight ago I listened to a Property Manager, telling me she had to put up the rent on a West Coast property after instructions from the landlord, only to receive a threat from an associate of the tenant warning that “she can expect a brick through the window of her family home.” Should anyone have to tolerate threats like that?

Earlier this year, I heard from an anonymous business owner who had her office set on fire allegedly by the tenant, after refusing to extend a tenancy due to the abuse one of her property managers received. This case is under police investigation.

Everywhere I go around New Zealand, I see the depressing signs of tired Property Managers who no longer have the energy, desire or will to deal with the increasing demands of the job. 

Landlords are putting more and more unfair demands on Property Managers as too many try to dodge and avoid or work around changes in legislation that leaves Landlords and Property Managers open to sanction. Some just simply bully their Property Managers into submission. Property Managers have spent years advising landlords on multiple occasions in terms of their legal responsibilities yet even at this late stage, many landlords still simply ignore these demands.

Then there is the incessant whining. 

“They won’t even turn the heat pump on! Why should I install it?”

“I’m putting up my rents by $40 a week!”

“Get them to clean the mould, they are creating it!”

In the near future, we expect to see more changes being announced in terms of protecting tenants, such as the removal of no cause evictions. But before Government announces this, we want them to stop and think.

It has been nearly two years since Natanya Campbell and her mum Wendy Campbell Rodgers were killed when they were making a property inspection in Northland.

Nothing has changed

In July 2017, Property Managers Wendy and Natanya Campbell turned up at one of their rental properties with contractor Jeff Pipe. Jeff had been instructed to install smoke alarms at the rental property to ensure that it was compliant under the Residential Tenancies Act. It seemed something wasn’t quite right as it is a little unusual for two Property Managers to turn up with a contractor for such a basic job. As they approach the property, the tenant, Quinn Patterson, opened fire on the party, killing both Wendy and Natanya Campbell and injuring Jeff Pipe.

The event sent shockwaves throughout the Property Management industry though unfortunately many, myself included, were not entirely surprised.

Now, nearly two years on from these tragic events, I ask myself have we actually learnt anything?

The simple answer is no. If anything, things have become worse and unfortunately, it would not surprise me if these tragic events happened again. 

So I finish with this. The average Property Manager in New Zealand knows that they will have to deal with conflict, it is unavoidable and part of the job. But abuse, threats and ridicule through social media is not in the job description. The number one priority of our industry should be to protect the thousands of people up and down the country who just want to do a good job. Look after them and they, in turn, will look after you.

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